John Stackhouse

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John G. Stackhouse, Jr., PhD, serves as the Samuel J. Mikolaski Professor of Religious Studies at Crandall University in Moncton, New Brunswick. A graduate of Queen’s University, Wheaton Graduate School, and the University of Chicago, he was formerly Professor of Religion at the University of Manitoba and held the Sangwoo Youtong Chee Chair of Theology and Culture at Regent College, Vancouver. He has given interviews to ABC, NBC, CBC, CTV, and Global TV as well as to CBC Radio from coast to coast. His work has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Times Literary Supplement, The Globe and Mail, the National Post, The Atlantic, Time, and Maclean’s. Author of over 800 articles, book chapters, and reviews, his eleventh book will be released later this year: “Can I Believe? Christianity for the Hesitant” (Oxford University Press).

When I was a student in the 1970s and 1980s, postmodernity and Critical Theory were still cool.
I freely confess that John Lennon is not my favourite songwriter.
City streets are filling with demonstrators on behalf of black and indigenous victims of police brutality, and against racism generally.
George Steiner, the literary critic, Wynton Marsalis, the celebrated trumpeter, and Doug Gilmour, the Hall-of-Fame hockey player, walk into a
The internet is telling me that as a white person I should feel guilty for all the bad things that
It’s easy to mock all the statue-removers as crazy mobs accomplishing nothing on behalf of the real victims of racism,
“It is hard to overstate the magnitude of this decision, and the size of the loss to religious and social
“There is no good police versus bad police,” avers Brock University sociologist Tamari Kitossa.
Religion and politics keep intersecting, at home and abroad.

When I was a student in the 1970s and 1980s, postmodernity and Critical Theory were still cool.

I freely confess that John Lennon is not my favourite songwriter.

City streets are filling with demonstrators on behalf of black and indigenous victims of police brutality, and against racism generally.

George Steiner, the literary critic, Wynton Marsalis, the celebrated trumpeter, and Doug Gilmour, the Hall-of-Fame hockey player, walk into a

The internet is telling me that as a white person I should feel guilty for all the bad things that

It’s easy to mock all the statue-removers as crazy mobs accomplishing nothing on behalf of the real victims of racism,

“It is hard to overstate the magnitude of this decision, and the size of the loss to religious and social

“There is no good police versus bad police,” avers Brock University sociologist Tamari Kitossa.

Religion and politics keep intersecting, at home and abroad.